Date: 
Monday, September 5, 2016 - 12:15

The People and Gardens cricket team won their annual charity match against the Eden Project yesterday (Sunday) by six runs, in a nail-biting encounter that went all the way to the last ball.

The match, which took place at St. Austell Cricket Club under overcast skies, was the sixth played between the two teams and the series score now stands at 4-2 to People and Gardens.

People and Gardens scored 165 in their 20 overs with the Eden Project managing 159. Standout performers for the victors included cultured batsmen James Kirwan and Rob Woolcock and captain Nick Dorson, while Eden opener Jed Langdon and combative all-rounder Dave Harland were their team’s best performers on the day.

The event is a fundraiser for People and Gardens, a project which gives people with physical and emotional impairments the opportunity to learn all aspects of growing and selling vegetables, while developing their confidence levels too.

The idea for the annual match was concocted by Bill Simpson, an avid cricket fan, qualified coach and Development Manager of People and Gardens.

Bill said: “It was another close match in this hotly-contested series and the team is very happy that they’ve won and extended their lead to 4-2.

“The team have been training hard since last year’s match and everyone gave their best out there. We hope the spectators enjoyed their day out and we’d like to thank St. Austell Cricket Club for kindly letting us use their pitch and pavilion for the day.”

People and Gardens is a community interest company that runs a vegetable bag scheme, which offers a fortnightly bag of top-quality produce, available for £13 for a large bag or £10 for a small one.

People and Gardens was set up in 1997 by Ken and Lorraine Radford and in that time, the horticulture skills of the team have developed so much that the group now supplies the Eden Project’s kitchens and delivers fresh produce to more than 70 households in Cornwall each month.

The team have helped more than 150 people to make real improvements in their lives and some of these people have gone on to live independently, to study and to find jobs.

For more information, see www.peopleandgardens.co.uk.

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