This exquisite plot sits in a sunny spot in our Mediterranean Biome, filled with the scents of beautifully fragrant plants such as jasmine, roses, bergamot, lilies, freesia, lavender and thyme.  

The courtyard-like space is reminiscent of the Moorish gardens of Southern Spain, with decorative tile work, white walls and terracotta pots. 

Scented stories

The garden also features the stories of some of the best-loved scented plants….

There is caraway, whose dried seeds yield a warm, sweet, spicy essential oil. The intense oil can only be used in small quantities in perfumery, and may be used to complement jasmine fragrance. 

Spanish broom has been prized as a perfume plant since the times of the Ancient Greeks and Romans. Its essence is a thick, dark brown liquid with a sweet, rosy scent mixed with a green hay-like scent.  

It is claimed that the camphor-rich essential oil of Spanish sage can improve mood and mental abilities. 

The oil of its fellow herb rosemary has a strong, fresh aroma. It can be an ingredient of colognes but because its distinctive scent is so strongly linked to food and cooking, it needs to be used with care in perfumery. 

The scent of pinks is reminiscent of childhood, encouraging happy, carefree feelings when used in aromatherapy. The essential oil has a rich, clove like scent and is most frequently used in masculine fragrances.

Sweet Osmanthus flower fragrance is said to have the wonderful effect of increasing happiness. In its native China it is highly regarded, and regularly grown for its scented flowers which are added to teas. The flowers produce a thick liquid with beautiful yet complex fruity, honey notes.

Learn how to create your own perfume garden at home, with tips from our Horticulturist Catherine Cutler.

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