Date: 
Friday, February 26, 2010 - 11:15

The Eden Project has launched a unique online ‘green’ careers resource, funded by the DCSF. Focussed on jobs that contribute towards building a sustainable future, Real Cool Futures features an interactive data base of inspirational case studies, written and film.

In addition to the range of career-related information that the site holds, Real Cool Futures provides a downloadable range of innovative teaching resources designed in partnership with practising secondary school teachers. The resource’s aim is to support teaching professionals in careers education, PHSE and across a number of other curriculum subjects.

As an educational charity, the Eden Project offers programmes, resources and special events exploring geography, science, and global citizenship for students at KS1-4, welcoming over 40,000 school pupils annually. Real Cool Futures is Eden’s first online initiative to reach secondary schools across the UK.

Tim Smit, chief executive of the Eden Project, said: “Young people are our country's greatest asset and the Eden Project has created Real Cool Futures to inspire young adults, helping them discover careers that will meet their aspirations of making a living, and a really positive contribution to the planet we live on. Many young people are concerned about our impact on the climate and the environment, but can’t see what society is doing about it or what they could do to make a change. Eden has launched this initiative because we want to show that careers don't always follow a prescribed pattern and that a huge range of experiences go into making an effective professional and that a sustainable future is theirs to make.

“Real Cool Futures provides the inspiration from a range of case studies that show that ‘growing up’ and getting a job doesn't mean leaving your ideals and aspirations behind. On the contrary, we seek to demonstrate that those fired by the desire to make a contribution are our most valuable citizens and that lies right at the heart of this project.”

Lucy Parker, chair of the DCSF’s Talent and Enterprise taskforce, agrees: “There has never been a more important time to help young people build skills aligned with their talents to enable them to pursue, or even create a fulfilling and ethically responsible career. Innate talent is the UK’s best natural resource and the only way out of recession is to ensure that skills and talent are given paramount importance in education and in later life. Developed countries must continue to develop; it will be our ability to innovate, to dream up the new to face the challenges of the 21st century. To be both responsible and daring will help us progress and flourish, as individuals and as a whole.”